March 26, 2020 By Kira-Ana Off

Violing buying guide

If you’re shopping for a beginning student, you may be tempted to rent an instrument since your student’s commitment is unproven. There are some good reasons to opt for a purchase instead. These include:

Long-term rental fees can add up quickly. A perfectly playable entry-level violin can usually be purchased for less than the cost of a year’s rental.
A well-chosen beginner’s instrument that is well cared for will retain its value and usually return a substantial part of its purchase price when sold used or traded in for a better quality instrument.
Higher-quality violins may appreciate in value over time; their voices “open up” as they age.
Rental instruments may be a bit worse for wear with nicks, scratches, tape marks on the fingerboard, and come with used strings and an already rosined bow. You’re also liable for any damage on a rented violin.

Speak with violinists (teachers) in your area and the experts at your local violin shop, one that conducts instrument repairs. These craftsmen, called luthiers, are happy to share their expertise about particular instruments and brands. Rather than speaking from a sales standpoint, luthiers and teachers have an abiding love of the instrument and like true enthusiasts, will want to impart their wisdom to beginners. Violin Online Shopping Vietnam

As you begin your appointment, the shop owner will lay out a selection of violins and bows for you to try that span the lower to higher spectrums of your price range. It is important to give yourself enough time to thoroughly play through all of the instruments. Pick an instrument to begin with and than continue to cycle through the line up, eliminating an instrument each time until you are left with your final choice. Sometimes you will be able to tell immediately whether an instrument is right for you or not. Even if you’re not a highly experienced player it is important to trust your instincts. After you have gone through the processes of elimination to choose a violin, it is important that you repeat the process to determine the correct bow for both you, and the instrument.

That said, if you decide to buy a full-size violin, you may well want to go to a violin dealer or a “luthier,” which is a person who makes or repairs stringed instruments. In fact, we have a directory of luthiers right here on Violinist.com, as well as a directory of the merchants who support Violinist.com.

When purchasing an instrument from a store, it is always an excellent idea to go in the company of an experienced violinist or luthier. In general, however, the instrument must be solid to the touch with no creaks when you press down (but not too heavily!) anywhere on the violin. If it is possible to test the instrument in-store, all of the open strings should sound full, resonant, and pleasing to the ear.

It is possible to buy a good violin online, but be wary of extremely cheap violins. Here is a link to our article about why an extremely cheap violin may not be a bargain for you. It is best if you can test a violin before making the commitment to buy it.

Price range: Before you start searching for a violin, it’s a good idea to set a budget. Quality violins usually start at around $500, then go up from there depending on the violin brand you choose. Remember, you will most likely have to buy a violin bow and case separately, so be sure to factor that into your budget, as well. By setting a budget, you’ll be able to narrow down your search by weeding out instruments that are not within your price range. For Vietname and South East Asia please check the best online shop for violins : Mua sam truc tuyen violon Viet Nam

Professional violins are usually constructed from highly-quality wood, hand-built and assembled by a luthier, and finished with high-quality components, such as an ebony fingerboard. These instruments, which are only appropriate for professional and advanced musicians, can cost anywhere from $4,000 to $10,000.

In-store

Pros:

You can try it out: One of the great things about buying a violin in-store is that you can try it before you buy it! It’s common for buyers to request to try out a violin brand at the shop. In fact, many shops have practice rooms for that exact purpose. Also, most violin shops are open to letting students borrow a violin for up to two weeks.
Knowledgeable staff members: If you’re a first-time buyer and don’t feel comfortable purchasing online, then you might want to opt for buying in-store. Most music shops have knowledgeable staff members on the floor who can match you up with the best violin brand.